» » The Lost Explorer

Download links

The Lost Explorer by Conrad Anker
PDF format

1580 downloads at 29 mb/s

The Lost Explorer by Conrad Anker
EPUB format

1462 downloads at 15 mb/s

The Lost Explorer by Conrad Anker
FB2 format

1301 downloads at 19 mb/s
In 1999, Conrad Anker found the body of George Mallory on Mount Everest, casting an entirely new light on the mystery of the lost explorer. On 8 June 1924, George Leigh Mallory and Andrew 'Sandy' Irvine were last seen climbing towards the summit of Everest. The clouds closed around them and they were lost to history, leaving the world to wonder whether or not they actually reached the summit - some 29 years before Edmund Hillary and Tensing Norgay. On 1 May 1999, Conrad Anker, one of the world's foremost mountaineers, made the momentous discovery - Mallory's body, lying frozen into the scree at 27,000 feet on Everest's north face. Recounting this day, the authors go on to assess the clues provided by the body, its position, and the possibility that Mallory had successfully climbed the Second Step, a 90-foot sheer cliff that is the single hardest obstacle on the north face. This is a remarkable story of a charming and immensely able man, told by an equally talented modern climber.

The Lost Explorer

Author: Conrad Anker

Title: The Lost Explorer

ISBN: 1841192112

ISBN13: 978-1841192116

Publisher: Robinson Publishing; 1 edition (May 25, 2000)

Language: English

Subcategory: Asia

Size pdf version: 1462 kb

Size epub version: 1301 kb

Size fb2 version: 1580 kb

Rating: 4.5/5

Pages: 204 pages


Reviews (7)
Cel
Spellbinding account of Conrad Anker's discovery of Mallory's body on Everest in 1999. Just an amazing tale, and very respectful of the man and his legend and what Mallory was able to accomplish in gear that seems antiquated and totally insufficient by today's standards (e.g., tweed jacket, leather hiking boots, no crampons). Mesmerizing read, I devoured it in a couple of hours.
Cel
Spellbinding account of Conrad Anker's discovery of Mallory's body on Everest in 1999. Just an amazing tale, and very respectful of the man and his legend and what Mallory was able to accomplish in gear that seems antiquated and totally insufficient by today's standards (e.g., tweed jacket, leather hiking boots, no crampons). Mesmerizing read, I devoured it in a couple of hours.
Qwert
The fascinating story of George Mallory and "Sandy" Irvine's 1924 attempt to be the first to climb to the summit of Mount Everest, their disappearance, and speculation over whether or not they achieved their goal was made relevant again in 1999 when the body of Mallory was found. In "The Search for Mallory & Irvine" BBC film producer Peter Firstbrook discusses the efforts to find the remains of the mountaineers and what locating the body of Mallory did and did not reveal about their legendary climb. This reviewer was left wanting more information about the search and discovery.

Firstbrook examines the background of Mallory as related to his future climbing career with one constant theme: though agile and sure-footed, he demonstrated a recklessness and absent-mindedness that would follow him all his life. As a student at Winchester College, Mallory was taught to climb by headmaster Graham Irving who was known for his unconventional mountaineering techniques. Later, as a teacher at Charterhouse, Mallory took students on climbs. He had an unconventional approach to teaching as well and was known for having radical social views for his time. After serving in the First World War, Mallory's ambition focused on what was considered to be the third and last "Pole": the highest point on earth, Mount Everest.

The author discusses the history of Everest. Though the way mountain height is measured was a bit confusing, Firstbrook clearly explains how mountains were created using analogies (i.e. a rug slid against a wall). The chapter on Himalayan exploration was tedious, though the clandestine activities of Nain Singh were interesting. This reviewer was antsy to get to the climb and search for Mallory.

The British Mount Everest Expeditions of 1921, 1922, and 1924 are examined including the sometimes conflicting personalities involved and the controversy over the use of oxygen ("English air" as Mallory once referred to it). All that is known about the final ascent is detailed, although Firstbrook does not elaborate on why expedition member Edward Norton thought Mallory unfit to make the attempt (pg. 158). The legend of Mallory and Irvine and whether they made it to the top continued long after Sir Edmund Hillary made the first official climb to the peak. In 1975, Chinese climber Hong-bao Wang described finding the remains of an old English mountaineer. This story and research into the location of the Chinese camp sparked plans to search for the body (believed, at the time, to be Irvine's) for the 75th anniversary of Mallory & Irvine's ill-fated summit attempt.

This reviewer was left wanting to read more about the search efforts. Perhaps because the body was found so quickly, it seemed rushed, which was surprising considering the author was a member of the team. What was found on the body was very interesting, but did it reveal anything about how far up Everest they reached? The positioning of the body did not match the description by Wang, so did he perhaps find Irvine? This idea is not discussed. In watching the documentary, more is made of Mallory possessing a photo of his wife Ruth that he had planned to place on the summit than is mentioned in this book. Also, this reviewer was under the impression that Conrad Anker's free-climb of the Second Step happened that same year. Watching the documentary, it was clear it happened years later (2007).

A helpful glossary of terms and people conclude the book as well as an index. Future editions cold use a good proof-read and edit, as several misspelled words were found as well as awkward sentences and a misplaced quote (i.e. pg. 31). At one point Graham Hoyland (who spear-headed the 1999 project) was mentioned as the great-uncle of 1922 and 1924 expedition doctor-climber Howard Somervell (he was, obviously, his great-nephew) (pg. 208). In one paragraph, Firstbrook mentions the age of expedition leader Charlie Bruce twice, but not the age of his deputy Edward Strutt which pertained to a quote by Bruce "It may possibly be that we are a little too young for him" (pg. 101). Otherwise, "The Search for..." is an interesting book on an intriguing subject, but, for those beyond the casual reader, this reviewer recommends seeking additional works for a more thorough examination of the 1999 Mallory and Irvine Research Expedition.
Qwert
The fascinating story of George Mallory and "Sandy" Irvine's 1924 attempt to be the first to climb to the summit of Mount Everest, their disappearance, and speculation over whether or not they achieved their goal was made relevant again in 1999 when the body of Mallory was found. In "The Search for Mallory & Irvine" BBC film producer Peter Firstbrook discusses the efforts to find the remains of the mountaineers and what locating the body of Mallory did and did not reveal about their legendary climb. This reviewer was left wanting more information about the search and discovery.

Firstbrook examines the background of Mallory as related to his future climbing career with one constant theme: though agile and sure-footed, he demonstrated a recklessness and absent-mindedness that would follow him all his life. As a student at Winchester College, Mallory was taught to climb by headmaster Graham Irving who was known for his unconventional mountaineering techniques. Later, as a teacher at Charterhouse, Mallory took students on climbs. He had an unconventional approach to teaching as well and was known for having radical social views for his time. After serving in the First World War, Mallory's ambition focused on what was considered to be the third and last "Pole": the highest point on earth, Mount Everest.

The author discusses the history of Everest. Though the way mountain height is measured was a bit confusing, Firstbrook clearly explains how mountains were created using analogies (i.e. a rug slid against a wall). The chapter on Himalayan exploration was tedious, though the clandestine activities of Nain Singh were interesting. This reviewer was antsy to get to the climb and search for Mallory.

The British Mount Everest Expeditions of 1921, 1922, and 1924 are examined including the sometimes conflicting personalities involved and the controversy over the use of oxygen ("English air" as Mallory once referred to it). All that is known about the final ascent is detailed, although Firstbrook does not elaborate on why expedition member Edward Norton thought Mallory unfit to make the attempt (pg. 158). The legend of Mallory and Irvine and whether they made it to the top continued long after Sir Edmund Hillary made the first official climb to the peak. In 1975, Chinese climber Hong-bao Wang described finding the remains of an old English mountaineer. This story and research into the location of the Chinese camp sparked plans to search for the body (believed, at the time, to be Irvine's) for the 75th anniversary of Mallory & Irvine's ill-fated summit attempt.

This reviewer was left wanting to read more about the search efforts. Perhaps because the body was found so quickly, it seemed rushed, which was surprising considering the author was a member of the team. What was found on the body was very interesting, but did it reveal anything about how far up Everest they reached? The positioning of the body did not match the description by Wang, so did he perhaps find Irvine? This idea is not discussed. In watching the documentary, more is made of Mallory possessing a photo of his wife Ruth that he had planned to place on the summit than is mentioned in this book. Also, this reviewer was under the impression that Conrad Anker's free-climb of the Second Step happened that same year. Watching the documentary, it was clear it happened years later (2007).

A helpful glossary of terms and people conclude the book as well as an index. Future editions cold use a good proof-read and edit, as several misspelled words were found as well as awkward sentences and a misplaced quote (i.e. pg. 31). At one point Graham Hoyland (who spear-headed the 1999 project) was mentioned as the great-uncle of 1922 and 1924 expedition doctor-climber Howard Somervell (he was, obviously, his great-nephew) (pg. 208). In one paragraph, Firstbrook mentions the age of expedition leader Charlie Bruce twice, but not the age of his deputy Edward Strutt which pertained to a quote by Bruce "It may possibly be that we are a little too young for him" (pg. 101). Otherwise, "The Search for..." is an interesting book on an intriguing subject, but, for those beyond the casual reader, this reviewer recommends seeking additional works for a more thorough examination of the 1999 Mallory and Irvine Research Expedition.
Groll
I love survival stories and this one was a little different since Conrad Anker actually found Sir Mallory. It is an interesting read and you don`t know how he feels completely about finding Mallory and if he thinks he was the first successful climber of Everest until the end of the book. I was not that familiar with Conrad Anker but am totally impressed with him and the way he lives life and how excellent of a climber he is. He is a great author as well.
Groll
I love survival stories and this one was a little different since Conrad Anker actually found Sir Mallory. It is an interesting read and you don`t know how he feels completely about finding Mallory and if he thinks he was the first successful climber of Everest until the end of the book. I was not that familiar with Conrad Anker but am totally impressed with him and the way he lives life and how excellent of a climber he is. He is a great author as well.
RED
The juxtaposition of the stories of two expeditions separated by more than 70 years was fascinating, and the differences between the two eras, in terms of personal codes of conduct, couldn't be more stark. The differences in the types of equipment available in the 1920s and now are enormous, and one wonders what George Mallory would have been able to do had he had the gear being used now. The controversy over finding his body seems a little silly, since it was inevitable, and Conrad Anker and his group seemed to have bee genuinely moved by their discovery and to have treated him with the respect and care he deserved.
RED
The juxtaposition of the stories of two expeditions separated by more than 70 years was fascinating, and the differences between the two eras, in terms of personal codes of conduct, couldn't be more stark. The differences in the types of equipment available in the 1920s and now are enormous, and one wonders what George Mallory would have been able to do had he had the gear being used now. The controversy over finding his body seems a little silly, since it was inevitable, and Conrad Anker and his group seemed to have bee genuinely moved by their discovery and to have treated him with the respect and care he deserved.
Jeb
I had a little trouble with two authors using different voices here but they both write very clearly and the facts are well presented. I find that real experts like Anker do a much better job telling mountaineering stories than journalists like Jon Krakauer. Real mountaineers seem to have more respect for the facts and less desire to sensationalized stories. Highly recommended.
Jeb
I had a little trouble with two authors using different voices here but they both write very clearly and the facts are well presented. I find that real experts like Anker do a much better job telling mountaineering stories than journalists like Jon Krakauer. Real mountaineers seem to have more respect for the facts and less desire to sensationalized stories. Highly recommended.
Jogrnd
A fast, easy, enjoyable read. A little too much focus though on "look what a great guy Conrad Anker is," not that I dispute his character. I can only assume the authors wrote, however unintentionally, from a perspective of moderate defensiveness, given all the criticism leveled at this expedition at the time. The book also didn't tell me much I didn't already know, except the finer details of the discovery and their climbs. For those who are looking for a good book on this subject, it's a fine one. But to those more versed on Mallory, there's little value added.
Jogrnd
A fast, easy, enjoyable read. A little too much focus though on "look what a great guy Conrad Anker is," not that I dispute his character. I can only assume the authors wrote, however unintentionally, from a perspective of moderate defensiveness, given all the criticism leveled at this expedition at the time. The book also didn't tell me much I didn't already know, except the finer details of the discovery and their climbs. For those who are looking for a good book on this subject, it's a fine one. But to those more versed on Mallory, there's little value added.
HyderCraft
This book will take you away. Just an amazing story of strength and determination ,and the heartbreaking reality of mountaineer ing. Written by a person who has been to the top of many mountains, it is only fitting that he would be the one to find Britain's most famous mountaineer and tell his story. Truly well written.
HyderCraft
This book will take you away. Just an amazing story of strength and determination ,and the heartbreaking reality of mountaineer ing. Written by a person who has been to the top of many mountains, it is only fitting that he would be the one to find Britain's most famous mountaineer and tell his story. Truly well written.
Well researched book about the effect of WWI on the young men of Britain which destroyed a generation. The larger portion documents the early attempts to climb the mountain. It gives a great deal of insight into the personalities of those explorers.
Well researched book about the effect of WWI on the young men of Britain which destroyed a generation. The larger portion documents the early attempts to climb the mountain. It gives a great deal of insight into the personalities of those explorers.

Related PDF / EPUB / FB2 Books