» » Caribbean Pleasure Industry: Tourism, Sexuality, and AIDS in the Dominican Republic (Worlds of Desire: The Chicago Series on Sexuality, Gender, and Culture)

In recent years, the economy of the Caribbean has become almost completely dependent on international tourism. And today one of the chief ways that foreign visitors there seek pleasure is through prostitution. While much has been written on the female sex workers who service these tourists, Caribbean Pleasure Industry shifts the focus onto the men. Drawing on his groundbreaking ethnographic research in the Dominican Republic, Mark Padilla discovers a complex world where the global political and economic impact of tourism has led to shifting sexual identities, growing economic pressures, and new challenges for HIV prevention. In fluid prose, Padilla analyzes men who have sex with male tourists, yet identify themselves as “normal” heterosexual men and struggle to maintain this status within their relationships with wives and girlfriends. Padilla’s exceptional ability to describe the experiences of these men will interest anthropologists, but his examination of bisexuality and tourism as much-neglected factors in the HIV/AIDS epidemic makes this book essential to anyone concerned with health and sexuality in the Caribbean or beyond.

Caribbean Pleasure Industry: Tourism, Sexuality, and AIDS in the Dominican Republic (Worlds of Desire: The Chicago Series on Sexuality, Gender, and Culture)

Author: Mark Padilla

Title: Caribbean Pleasure Industry: Tourism, Sexuality, and AIDS in the Dominican Republic (Worlds of Desire: The Chicago Series on Sexuality, Gender, and Culture)

ISBN: 0226644359

ISBN13: 978-0226644356

Publisher: University Of Chicago Press; 1 edition (September 15, 2007)

Language: English

Subcategory: Medicine

Size pdf version: 1182 kb

Size epub version: 1221 kb

Size fb2 version: 1585 kb

Rating: 4.3/5

Pages: 304 pages


Reviews (5)
Bliss
had to read this book for my Latin American sexuality and gender class. It was the perfect addition to our section on sex work and masculinity in the Dominican Republic section. Sheds light on the many problems and situations that lead people to make less than optimal decisions
Bliss
had to read this book for my Latin American sexuality and gender class. It was the perfect addition to our section on sex work and masculinity in the Dominican Republic section. Sheds light on the many problems and situations that lead people to make less than optimal decisions
Usic
The book arrived on date and in perfect conditions. It is an excellent ethnograpic in which the author questions the modern ocidental values in human relations by demonstrating that money is a vital part in the realtions established nowadays. Moreover, the author shows that, unlike the negative value attributed to the money in affetive relation between men, the money is a strong positive component that transforms the subjectivities of the involved in these relations.
Usic
The book arrived on date and in perfect conditions. It is an excellent ethnograpic in which the author questions the modern ocidental values in human relations by demonstrating that money is a vital part in the realtions established nowadays. Moreover, the author shows that, unlike the negative value attributed to the money in affetive relation between men, the money is a strong positive component that transforms the subjectivities of the involved in these relations.
Danrad
easy access.
Danrad
easy access.
AfinaS
I visit the Dominican Republic regularly and have extended family there. Even with that connection, I still was not able to understand the the background and motives of the so-called 'sanky panky' or the 'buggerones'. This book (which is a published doctoral dissertation) is a great read for anyone who is curious about the reasoning of those involved in the pleasure industry and want to know how this lifestyle came about. Although the book was written in 1999/2000, many of the places and activities are still relevant today. The writer goes into painstaking detail to explain the ethnograpic and historical context, complete with survey data and results, to give readers insight of those involved in the pleasure industry in the Dominican Republic. You will not be disappointed.
AfinaS
I visit the Dominican Republic regularly and have extended family there. Even with that connection, I still was not able to understand the the background and motives of the so-called 'sanky panky' or the 'buggerones'. This book (which is a published doctoral dissertation) is a great read for anyone who is curious about the reasoning of those involved in the pleasure industry and want to know how this lifestyle came about. Although the book was written in 1999/2000, many of the places and activities are still relevant today. The writer goes into painstaking detail to explain the ethnograpic and historical context, complete with survey data and results, to give readers insight of those involved in the pleasure industry in the Dominican Republic. You will not be disappointed.
Manazar
Most studies of sex tourism focus on female sex workers with foreign male clients. Even some studies look at men involved in sex work with foreign women. This book tries to fill in a gap by discussing Dominican men who sell sex to foreign male tourists. This book tries to break a rigid hetero/homo dichotomy by showing the many men who engage in hustling but with no desire for other males.

There is a rare but excellent anthology called "Caribbean Masculinities" and the author's contribution is reprinted here. Really, I hope this book is a sign that the author got tenure somewhere. The info in this book is similar to another study about "pingueros" in Cuba. Those who saw the French-language film "Vers le Sur" may also enjoy this.

The book NEVER mentions "the down-low" and this is understandable as the study takes place outside the United States. Nevertheless, for those interested in reading about Black men who get busy with men on the hush-hush, they'll want to read this book. The interviewees here never suggest that kicking it with men means they don't have women at home and desire women all the time. There's a lot of "don't ask, don't tell" here too. Relatives of these men don't question how men who are penniless on Friday afternoon can now pay the rent on Monday morning. There's also machismo here where women are conditioned not to question their male partners and these male sex workers can lie about getting with women when they are actually selling to men.

Let me mention the most important comment to me in this book: "[The Zona Colonial] also stands as the most vivid symbol of what has been described as a kind of Dominican "hispanophilia"--an exaggerated identification with all things of Spanish origin, and a simultaneous denial (and repression) of the African cultural influences on contemporary Dominican society" (81). A whole mess of books and word-of-mouth mention how Dominicans go out of their ways to downplay or deny being Black. While the author brings this up only once, I really wish he would have spoken about race more. He dances around it as many people in that nation do. A student could write an awesome paper comparing this book and "What's Love Got to Do with It?" and they will note how the latter is explicit about Blackness when the former plays into the denial.

Sometimes the book felt long-winded. However, this was not another anthropological text in which a writer just recalls, "First I did this, then I did that." This was an informative book about Black bisexuality in a transnational context.
Manazar
Most studies of sex tourism focus on female sex workers with foreign male clients. Even some studies look at men involved in sex work with foreign women. This book tries to fill in a gap by discussing Dominican men who sell sex to foreign male tourists. This book tries to break a rigid hetero/homo dichotomy by showing the many men who engage in hustling but with no desire for other males.

There is a rare but excellent anthology called "Caribbean Masculinities" and the author's contribution is reprinted here. Really, I hope this book is a sign that the author got tenure somewhere. The info in this book is similar to another study about "pingueros" in Cuba. Those who saw the French-language film "Vers le Sur" may also enjoy this.

The book NEVER mentions "the down-low" and this is understandable as the study takes place outside the United States. Nevertheless, for those interested in reading about Black men who get busy with men on the hush-hush, they'll want to read this book. The interviewees here never suggest that kicking it with men means they don't have women at home and desire women all the time. There's a lot of "don't ask, don't tell" here too. Relatives of these men don't question how men who are penniless on Friday afternoon can now pay the rent on Monday morning. There's also machismo here where women are conditioned not to question their male partners and these male sex workers can lie about getting with women when they are actually selling to men.

Let me mention the most important comment to me in this book: "[The Zona Colonial] also stands as the most vivid symbol of what has been described as a kind of Dominican "hispanophilia"--an exaggerated identification with all things of Spanish origin, and a simultaneous denial (and repression) of the African cultural influences on contemporary Dominican society" (81). A whole mess of books and word-of-mouth mention how Dominicans go out of their ways to downplay or deny being Black. While the author brings this up only once, I really wish he would have spoken about race more. He dances around it as many people in that nation do. A student could write an awesome paper comparing this book and "What's Love Got to Do with It?" and they will note how the latter is explicit about Blackness when the former plays into the denial.

Sometimes the book felt long-winded. However, this was not another anthropological text in which a writer just recalls, "First I did this, then I did that." This was an informative book about Black bisexuality in a transnational context.

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