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Dark Lords of the Sith (Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi, Volume Two)

Author: Chris Gossett,Art Wetherell,Kevin J. Anderson

Title: Dark Lords of the Sith (Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi, Volume Two)

ISBN: 1569710953

ISBN13: 978-1569710951

Publisher: Dark Horse Books (February 13, 1996)

Language: English

Subcategory: Graphic Novels

Size pdf version: 1546 kb

Size epub version: 1726 kb

Size fb2 version: 1669 kb

Rating: 4.6/5

Pages: 160 pages


Reviews (7)
Negal
Even though Tom Veitch and Kevin J. Anderson are two different scriptwriters you have to admire how the two worked together and crossovered two expanded universe Sith Lords from their respective scripts into being connected. And considering that it actually seemed to work and that EU fans liked it so much that further EU-related material refer to happenings that Veitch and Anderson scripted together and can reimagine it in a more shades of grey style scriptwriting, I'm giving this the highest rating.

Interesting enough the story of how the two Sith came to be and how their paths crossed started with the evil spirit of the Sith Lord Freedon Nadd who after abandoning his minions on Onderon managed to influence two nobles to start their own Sith cult who they named the Krath and through them turn one of his adversaries Ulic Qel-Droma to the Dark Side after bad circumstance caused Ulic to try to infiltrate the Krath and bring the cult down from within. Nadd's final attempt at monstermaking, after setting the stage with Aleema and Satal Keto and Ulic Qel-Droma, was Exar Kun, a renegade Jedi apprentice who in true Lovecraft style delved into things man was not meant to know by conductiong his own archaeological research into the Sith. Ironically enough Nadd's monstermaking turned to be his own undoing when his last student Exar Kun turned the tables on him and after a while reorganized a new Sith Order with Nadd's remaining students. While the Tales of the Jedi stories are meant to be centred on the Jedi in the Star Wars universe with themes concerning chivalry, evil sorcerers, fallen knights, hubris, temptation and descent to darkness and other stuff and that later scriptwriters interpret TOTJ-era and its aftermath in other ways and giving non-force users more screentime it did set the stage for much of the expanded universe.

One thing in particular that I enjoyed here was Hugh Fleming's impressive cover art.
Negal
Even though Tom Veitch and Kevin J. Anderson are two different scriptwriters you have to admire how the two worked together and crossovered two expanded universe Sith Lords from their respective scripts into being connected. And considering that it actually seemed to work and that EU fans liked it so much that further EU-related material refer to happenings that Veitch and Anderson scripted together and can reimagine it in a more shades of grey style scriptwriting, I'm giving this the highest rating.

Interesting enough the story of how the two Sith came to be and how their paths crossed started with the evil spirit of the Sith Lord Freedon Nadd who after abandoning his minions on Onderon managed to influence two nobles to start their own Sith cult who they named the Krath and through them turn one of his adversaries Ulic Qel-Droma to the Dark Side after bad circumstance caused Ulic to try to infiltrate the Krath and bring the cult down from within. Nadd's final attempt at monstermaking, after setting the stage with Aleema and Satal Keto and Ulic Qel-Droma, was Exar Kun, a renegade Jedi apprentice who in true Lovecraft style delved into things man was not meant to know by conductiong his own archaeological research into the Sith. Ironically enough Nadd's monstermaking turned to be his own undoing when his last student Exar Kun turned the tables on him and after a while reorganized a new Sith Order with Nadd's remaining students. While the Tales of the Jedi stories are meant to be centred on the Jedi in the Star Wars universe with themes concerning chivalry, evil sorcerers, fallen knights, hubris, temptation and descent to darkness and other stuff and that later scriptwriters interpret TOTJ-era and its aftermath in other ways and giving non-force users more screentime it did set the stage for much of the expanded universe.

One thing in particular that I enjoyed here was Hugh Fleming's impressive cover art.
Yggdi
This is one of my favorite comics. Definitely worth adding to my collection :)
Yggdi
This is one of my favorite comics. Definitely worth adding to my collection :)
Xal
I'm always bummed when the artwork changes for the last 1/6 of the book, but otherwise this is a great read. The extent to which authors Veitch and Anderson collaborated is evident, as these stories dovetail perfectly with the Jedi Academy-era novels (and Young/Junior Jedi Knight series) and the "Golden Age of the Sith" and "Fall of the Sith Empire" and "Dark Empire II" comics.

This book picks up where the Freedon Nadd duology leaves off, and builds up to the next series, "The Sith War."

Some of my favorite EU characters are introduced in this series, from Odan Urr to Vodo Baas to Ood Bnar to Qrrrl Toq, the alien races are imaginative and compelling. I only lament than the main characters had to be, as usual, human.

Aside from my few minor quibbles with the artwork, this book remains, twenty years later, one of my favorite Star Wars comics.
Xal
I'm always bummed when the artwork changes for the last 1/6 of the book, but otherwise this is a great read. The extent to which authors Veitch and Anderson collaborated is evident, as these stories dovetail perfectly with the Jedi Academy-era novels (and Young/Junior Jedi Knight series) and the "Golden Age of the Sith" and "Fall of the Sith Empire" and "Dark Empire II" comics.

This book picks up where the Freedon Nadd duology leaves off, and builds up to the next series, "The Sith War."

Some of my favorite EU characters are introduced in this series, from Odan Urr to Vodo Baas to Ood Bnar to Qrrrl Toq, the alien races are imaginative and compelling. I only lament than the main characters had to be, as usual, human.

Aside from my few minor quibbles with the artwork, this book remains, twenty years later, one of my favorite Star Wars comics.
Skunk Black
This is the best of the Tales of the Jedi series. Before you read it, you should at least read the first volume, titled simply Tales of the Jedi (sometimes with the subtitle Knights of the Old Republic, but that name now belongs to a video game series and a new monthly comic). It would also be good to read the short TotJ: The Freedon Nadd Uprising. The Golden Age of the Sith and the Fall of the Sith Empire predate this volume in the story chronology, but aren't necessary for understanding Dark Lords. (In fact, they should probably be avoided.)

Why is this the best? Veitch and Anderson's writing plays off each other, presenting the best of each and compensating for their weaknesses. The art in the first five chapters is fantastic, as are Dave Dorman's covers. The early TotJ stories have just enough implied backstory to hint at the larger world but it never leaves the reader confused. Korriban is one of my favorite Star Wars locations, and it was created here in crisp detail with millennia of history only hinted at.

What is lacking? The art in the sixth chapter is not so hot. The narration can be a bit comic-booky. Veitch was not involved in the subsequent volumes of TotJ, which are hit-and-miss. The Sith War is ultimately disappointing, but the Redemption of Ulic Qel-Droma was a fine coda to the series.
Skunk Black
This is the best of the Tales of the Jedi series. Before you read it, you should at least read the first volume, titled simply Tales of the Jedi (sometimes with the subtitle Knights of the Old Republic, but that name now belongs to a video game series and a new monthly comic). It would also be good to read the short TotJ: The Freedon Nadd Uprising. The Golden Age of the Sith and the Fall of the Sith Empire predate this volume in the story chronology, but aren't necessary for understanding Dark Lords. (In fact, they should probably be avoided.)

Why is this the best? Veitch and Anderson's writing plays off each other, presenting the best of each and compensating for their weaknesses. The art in the first five chapters is fantastic, as are Dave Dorman's covers. The early TotJ stories have just enough implied backstory to hint at the larger world but it never leaves the reader confused. Korriban is one of my favorite Star Wars locations, and it was created here in crisp detail with millennia of history only hinted at.

What is lacking? The art in the sixth chapter is not so hot. The narration can be a bit comic-booky. Veitch was not involved in the subsequent volumes of TotJ, which are hit-and-miss. The Sith War is ultimately disappointing, but the Redemption of Ulic Qel-Droma was a fine coda to the series.
AGAD
I am reviewing Tales of the Jedi Dark Lords of the Sith, ISBN: 1569710953 A TPB comic published Feb 1996 covering individuals issues 1 through 6 of the Dark Horse comic series Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi - Dark Lords of the Sith written by Tom Veitch and KJA. It has the same Hugh Fleming cover as the comic shown in Amazon as Titan books ISBN 1840231297 published nov 1999.
The Art and coloring are still the older style and get about 2.5. the story, as Tom Veitch tells us is intended to reflect what was revealed in Holocrons that are discovered 1,000's of years later. In particular, they foreshadow what happens to Luke Skywalker in dark empire. This is an intense and serious contribution to the star wars Galaxy, and my version is over 100 pages. I think it is worthwhile, and I did like it better the second time I read it, especially if you later read the Jedi Academy Book Trilogy by Kevin J Anderson, I Jedi and Dark Empire by Dark Horse.
There is also an audio tape version of this comic that is a complete dramatization, rather than just a reading; I am reviewing Audio book ISBN: 1565111990 - In short, the dramatization format can be hard to follow at times, but I thought that overall they did a good job - 3 stars.
AGAD
I am reviewing Tales of the Jedi Dark Lords of the Sith, ISBN: 1569710953 A TPB comic published Feb 1996 covering individuals issues 1 through 6 of the Dark Horse comic series Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi - Dark Lords of the Sith written by Tom Veitch and KJA. It has the same Hugh Fleming cover as the comic shown in Amazon as Titan books ISBN 1840231297 published nov 1999.
The Art and coloring are still the older style and get about 2.5. the story, as Tom Veitch tells us is intended to reflect what was revealed in Holocrons that are discovered 1,000's of years later. In particular, they foreshadow what happens to Luke Skywalker in dark empire. This is an intense and serious contribution to the star wars Galaxy, and my version is over 100 pages. I think it is worthwhile, and I did like it better the second time I read it, especially if you later read the Jedi Academy Book Trilogy by Kevin J Anderson, I Jedi and Dark Empire by Dark Horse.
There is also an audio tape version of this comic that is a complete dramatization, rather than just a reading; I am reviewing Audio book ISBN: 1565111990 - In short, the dramatization format can be hard to follow at times, but I thought that overall they did a good job - 3 stars.

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