» » Batman: Absolution
Years after Wayne Enterprises is attacked by terrorists, Batman is finally close to finding the perpetrators of the crime, but the nearer he gets, the more he questions his ideas about revenge, justice, retribution, and absolution.

Batman: Absolution

Author: Brian Ashmore,J.M. DeMatteis

Title: Batman: Absolution

ISBN: 1563899345

ISBN13: 978-1563899348

Publisher: DC Comics (November 1, 2002)

Language: English

Subcategory: Graphic Novels

Size pdf version: 1993 kb

Size epub version: 1188 kb

Size fb2 version: 1536 kb

Rating: 4.6/5

Pages: 96 pages


Reviews (7)
Mightdragon
I was into the story, loved the art, the dialogue, and the angst, and.....the thrust of the conflict between the Children of Maya and The Bat peters out into inanity. I liked everything but that. The final two pages, with Batman still an indominatble spirit, flawed but resolute, I liked. In fact, every since Frank Miller's, "Batman: The Dark Knight Returns", I've been in love with the character. He's a superhero without superhero powers and his internal dialogues has been as intruiging as any of the external problems he's faced. In "Absolution" we have a story that gives full power to the internal angst that Batman faces in his lifelong struggle against the predators among us. Unfortunately, the climax depends on an apparent suicidal destructive act by the villian which resolves nothing except a need for plot development. It's not bad, it could have been so-so much better.
Mightdragon
I was into the story, loved the art, the dialogue, and the angst, and.....the thrust of the conflict between the Children of Maya and The Bat peters out into inanity. I liked everything but that. The final two pages, with Batman still an indominatble spirit, flawed but resolute, I liked. In fact, every since Frank Miller's, "Batman: The Dark Knight Returns", I've been in love with the character. He's a superhero without superhero powers and his internal dialogues has been as intruiging as any of the external problems he's faced. In "Absolution" we have a story that gives full power to the internal angst that Batman faces in his lifelong struggle against the predators among us. Unfortunately, the climax depends on an apparent suicidal destructive act by the villian which resolves nothing except a need for plot development. It's not bad, it could have been so-so much better.
Mikale
I like Batman. What a book to help with that!
Mikale
I like Batman. What a book to help with that!
Berkohi
I've never been steeped in the Batman mythology and universe - I was just looking for an interesting afternoon read when I picked this up. It was a quick read - taking around an hour to get from one end of the book to the other.

The plot device of searching for a killer was all a maguffin to explore existential/religious implications of modern society. Much of the story is a series of stream of conscious thought balloons that honestly we've seen before (e.g., Batman pondering Bruce Wayne and saying that Bruce is the masked character and the Batman is his true self, etc.).

This is the third Batman in the last month that I've picked up and has been over the top pretentious about philosophy. I admit I'm not really interested in Batman's musings on the Catholic church, budhism, etc. It introduces an ambivalence and grounds a fantastical character into a grim (yet unbelievable) reality.

The modern Dark Knight Batman aimed for adults can really be done well (The Miller books, for example, brought a brittle humanity to the characters that hasn't been matched). Or it can be done as this book and feel both unbelievable/illogical yet too grounded in reality.

The artwork is fine - thought the Batman is the old grey tights type. I wonder if putting a more modern spin on the art of the Batman character himself might have been more appropriate.
Berkohi
I've never been steeped in the Batman mythology and universe - I was just looking for an interesting afternoon read when I picked this up. It was a quick read - taking around an hour to get from one end of the book to the other.

The plot device of searching for a killer was all a maguffin to explore existential/religious implications of modern society. Much of the story is a series of stream of conscious thought balloons that honestly we've seen before (e.g., Batman pondering Bruce Wayne and saying that Bruce is the masked character and the Batman is his true self, etc.).

This is the third Batman in the last month that I've picked up and has been over the top pretentious about philosophy. I admit I'm not really interested in Batman's musings on the Catholic church, budhism, etc. It introduces an ambivalence and grounds a fantastical character into a grim (yet unbelievable) reality.

The modern Dark Knight Batman aimed for adults can really be done well (The Miller books, for example, brought a brittle humanity to the characters that hasn't been matched). Or it can be done as this book and feel both unbelievable/illogical yet too grounded in reality.

The artwork is fine - thought the Batman is the old grey tights type. I wonder if putting a more modern spin on the art of the Batman character himself might have been more appropriate.
Jieylau
I could follow the thin plot. Batman goes after a female terrorist who appears to seek redemption for her past misdeeds. He eventually tracks her to an ashram in India.

In fact, this staging is a comics disaster. The clash of comics superhero culture and Hindu philosophy leads to very jarring discords. It's like Batman meets Gandhi meets Indian travelog. There is a scene where the Taj Mahal is introduced to Bruce Wayne. Whatever for?

In addition, how does Batman keep his identity secret? It would be pretty obvious when a white guy of the same build as Batman swings into a small Indian town. Surprisingly, if not for the artwork, the plot feels like it could have been written in the 70s -80s.

Numerous flashbacks are tiresome but what galls me most is the really small italicised font used. It really is a stupid editorial decision.
Jieylau
I could follow the thin plot. Batman goes after a female terrorist who appears to seek redemption for her past misdeeds. He eventually tracks her to an ashram in India.

In fact, this staging is a comics disaster. The clash of comics superhero culture and Hindu philosophy leads to very jarring discords. It's like Batman meets Gandhi meets Indian travelog. There is a scene where the Taj Mahal is introduced to Bruce Wayne. Whatever for?

In addition, how does Batman keep his identity secret? It would be pretty obvious when a white guy of the same build as Batman swings into a small Indian town. Surprisingly, if not for the artwork, the plot feels like it could have been written in the 70s -80s.

Numerous flashbacks are tiresome but what galls me most is the really small italicised font used. It really is a stupid editorial decision.
Jum
The bulk of Batman: Absolution is told through thought bubble ruminations of topics philosophical and ethical in nature. The plot is fairly thin: a terrorist bombing of Wayne Enterprises sets Batman on a ten-year hunt for the perpetrator -- a woman named Jennifer Blake. The hunt for Blake has become something of a personal vendetta for Batman, and his rage and tunnel-vision has made him unreasonable when he discovers that Blake may not be who she once was.

If the goal of Dematteis was to get the reader to struggle with Batman's point of view, then he succeeded, at the expense of an interesting plot. The reader is placed at odds with Batman, stuck in the middle of him and Jennfier Blake, whose character represents a question that asks of us, "can people change after knowingly committing a horrible atrocity? Can they be forgiven?" Batman is stalwart in his answer: "no redemption". By the end of Absolution, Batman barely budges from the unwavering righteousness he displays throughout the story. He is nearly unmovable in the staunchness of his principles and morality, and it makes him come off as stubborn, which if you've read a Batman book in the past 10 years then you are probably familiar with this personality trait, although in the hand of some writers, Bats can be more or less flexible. This is fine and good if you like that kind of Batman, but the issue I took with Absolution's version was the sheer verbosity of Batman's thoughts, most of which comes of as preachy and very pretentious. That would have been acceptable if there was more to the plot, but what's there felt perfunctory at best.

I have never been fond of the painterly art style by the likes of Alex Ross and Brian Ashmore, the latter's work of which this book contains. The emotions in the words often fails to translate in the artwork, which makes some expressions appear odd and most action scenes stilted and clumsy. Works well for pages that require superhero posturing, though.

Batman: Absolution is not an action-packed adventure nor an intricately-plotted mystery, but it does actively engage the reader in contemplating the implications of Batman's moral and philosophical stance. It makes for a thought-provoking read, but perhaps also a rather dry one if you're looking for a plot like the types mentioned just above.
Jum
The bulk of Batman: Absolution is told through thought bubble ruminations of topics philosophical and ethical in nature. The plot is fairly thin: a terrorist bombing of Wayne Enterprises sets Batman on a ten-year hunt for the perpetrator -- a woman named Jennifer Blake. The hunt for Blake has become something of a personal vendetta for Batman, and his rage and tunnel-vision has made him unreasonable when he discovers that Blake may not be who she once was.

If the goal of Dematteis was to get the reader to struggle with Batman's point of view, then he succeeded, at the expense of an interesting plot. The reader is placed at odds with Batman, stuck in the middle of him and Jennfier Blake, whose character represents a question that asks of us, "can people change after knowingly committing a horrible atrocity? Can they be forgiven?" Batman is stalwart in his answer: "no redemption". By the end of Absolution, Batman barely budges from the unwavering righteousness he displays throughout the story. He is nearly unmovable in the staunchness of his principles and morality, and it makes him come off as stubborn, which if you've read a Batman book in the past 10 years then you are probably familiar with this personality trait, although in the hand of some writers, Bats can be more or less flexible. This is fine and good if you like that kind of Batman, but the issue I took with Absolution's version was the sheer verbosity of Batman's thoughts, most of which comes of as preachy and very pretentious. That would have been acceptable if there was more to the plot, but what's there felt perfunctory at best.

I have never been fond of the painterly art style by the likes of Alex Ross and Brian Ashmore, the latter's work of which this book contains. The emotions in the words often fails to translate in the artwork, which makes some expressions appear odd and most action scenes stilted and clumsy. Works well for pages that require superhero posturing, though.

Batman: Absolution is not an action-packed adventure nor an intricately-plotted mystery, but it does actively engage the reader in contemplating the implications of Batman's moral and philosophical stance. It makes for a thought-provoking read, but perhaps also a rather dry one if you're looking for a plot like the types mentioned just above.

Related PDF / EPUB / FB2 Books